RESOURCES

Useful Information

Here is some information to help guide you through the international shipping process.
SHIPPING TIPS

Things to Consider

  • Shipper and Consignee’s Responsibility

    The shipper is the exporter or the company or individual transporting the goods from its origin. The shipper is responsible to know the export laws of the country they are shipping from. We can ship just about any product but that does not mean it will be accepted from the country it is shipping from. It is critical that the exporter checks with the necessary agencies to confirm that their goods are acceptable for export.

    The consignee is the importer or the company or individual receiving the shipment at its destination. The consignee is responsible to know and understand the import laws of the country they are importing into. We can ship just about any commodity but that does not mean it will be allowed into the country it is being shipped to. Therefore, it is imperative that the consignee understands these laws before they decide to import goods.

  • Customs

    Customs in any country play a vital role with international shipments. Whether you are exporting or importing, customs in any country have the power to stop, inspect, and seize your cargo with or without notice. Allison Shipping International nor anyone else have any control over customs as they govern all international shipments. Any charges that incur resulting from customs inspection(s), duty, tax, etc. will be to the account of the shipper or consignee. It is imperative that you are conducting your shipment lawfully as fines and/or jail sentences can be issued by customs should you be caught.

  • Incoterms

    Allison Shipping moves freight all around the world in compliance with the International Chamber of Commerce’s Incoterms. Incoterms are the standard trading terms between the seller and the buyer. It states which tasks, costs, and risks are associated with the buyer and seller. It is critical that all parties involved with the shipment understand these terms. This is to properly ensure that all shipments are properly routed in accordance with the ICC. Attached is a document that can help you better understand this concept as it indicates the various terms and their function.

    EXW
    Ex Works
    Freight: Seller’s premises.
    Risk: Seller’s premises.
    Seller responsible for making the goods available at the seller’s premises. Buyer bears the full risk from there to destination.
    FCA
    Free Carrier
    Freight: Freight handler.
    Risk: Freight handler.
    Seller responsible for delivery to the custody of carrier, identified by the buyer. Risk is transferred when loading has taken place.
    CPT
    Carriage Paid to
    Freight: Destination.
    Risk: First freight handler.
    Seller delivers goods to the carrier at agreed place of delivery and pays transport to the named destination. Risk is transferred at place of delivery, whereas seller pays for transport to the destination.
    CIP
    Carriage and Insurance Paid to
    Freight: Destination.
    Risk: First freight handler.
    Seller delivers goods to carrier at agreed place of delivery and pays for transport and insurance to named destination. Risk transfers at the place of delivery, whereas seller pays 
for transport and insurance to the destination.
    DPU
    Delivered at Place Unloaded
    Freight: Destination.
    Risk: Destination.
    Seller delivers goods unloaded at a specified place. Risk is transferred as soon as goods have been unloaded.
    DAP
    Delivered at Place
    Freight: Place of destination.
    Risk: Arriving means of transport at destination.
    Seller delivers goods to disposal of buyer on arriving means of transport, at agreed place. Seller assumes risk until goods are made ready for unloading from the arriving means 
of transport.
    DDP
    Delivered Duty Paid
    Freight: Delivered
    Risk: Delivered.
    Seller responsible for bringing goods to the destination, paying any duty and making the goods available to buyer. Risk transfers as soon as buyer has access to goods ready for unloading at agreed destination.
    FAS
    Free Alongside Ship
    Freight: Shipside in port of departure.
    Risk: Shipside in port of departure.
    Seller is responsible for delivery of goods at quay alongside the ship. From this point onwards, risk lies with buyer.
    FOB
    Free on Board
    Freight: On board ship
    Risk: On board ship.
    Seller responsible for delivery of goods loaded on board the ship. Risk is transferred as soon as goods have been set down inside ship.
    CFR
    Cost and Freight
    Freight: Port of destination.
    Risk: On board ship.
    Seller covers cost of freight, duty unpaid, to named port of destination. Risk is transferred as soon as the goods have been set down inside ship.
    CIF
    Cost, Insurance, and Freight
    Freight: Port of destination.
    Risk: Port of destination.
    Seller covers cost of insurance and freight, duty unpaid, to named port of destination. Risk is transferred as soon as the goods have been set down inside ship.
  • Container Specifications
    Image
    20’ Standard
    Exterior
    Dimensions
    240" x 96" x 102"
    Interior
    Dimensions
    232" x 92" x 89"
    Volume
    Capacity
    1,170 CFT
    Tare Weight
    4,916 LBS
    Maximum
    Payload
    Weight
    47,900 LBS
    Image
    40’ Standard
    Exterior
    Dimensions
    480" x 96" x 102"
    Interior
    Dimensions
    473" x 92" x 89"
    Volume
    Capacity
    2,390 CFT
    Tare Weight
    8,330 LBS
    Maximum
    Payload
    Weight
    58,800 LBS
    Image
    40’ High Cube
    Exterior
    Dimensions
    480" x 96" x 114"
    Interior
    Dimensions
    473" x 92" x 102"
    Volume
    Capacity
    2,700 CFT
    Tare Weight
    8,860 LBS
    Maximum
    Payload
    Weight
    58,335 LBS
    Image
    45’ High Cube
    Exterior
    Dimensions
    540" x 96" x 114"
    Interior
    Dimensions
    533" x 92" x 101"
    Volume
    Capacity
    3,040 CFT
    Tare Weight
    10,580 LBS
    Maximum
    Payload
    Weight
    61,070 LBS
    Image
    20’ Standard Reefer
    Exterior
    Dimensions
    240" x 96" x 102"
    Interior
    Dimensions
    214" X 90" X 86"
    Volume
    Capacity
    998 CFT
    Tare Weight
    5,620 LBS
    Maximum
    Payload
    Weight
    47,290 LBS
    Image
    40’ High Cube Reefer
    Exterior
    Dimensions
    480" X 96" X 114"
    Interior
    Dimensions
    456" X 90" X 100"
    Volume
    Capacity
    2,384 CFT
    Tare Weight
    8,490 LBS
    Maximum
    Payload
    Weight
    58,700 LBS
    Image
    20’ Open Top
    Exterior
    Dimensions
    240" x 96" x 102"
    Interior
    Dimensions
    232" x 92" x 89"
    Volume
    Capacity
    1,136 CFT
    Tare Weight
    4,960 LBS
    Maximum
    Payload
    Weight
    66,250 LBS
    Image
    40’ Open Top High Cube
    Exterior
    Dimensions
    480" x 96" x 114"
    Interior
    Dimensions
    473" x 92" x 104"
    Volume
    Capacity
    2,645 CFT
    Tare Weight
    9,370 LBS
    Maximum
    Payload
    Weight
    62,280 LBS
    Image
    20’ Standard Flat Rack
    Exterior
    Dimensions
    240" x 96" x 102"
    Interior
    Dimensions
    222" x 96" x 88"
    Volume
    Capacity
    N/A
    Tare Weight
    6,400 LBS
    Maximum
    Payload
    Weight
    92,800 LBS
    Image
    40’ High Flat Rack
    Exterior
    Dimensions
    480" x 96" x 114"
    Interior
    Dimensions
    459" x 92" x 88"
    Volume
    Capacity
    N/A
    Tare Weight
    12,900 LBS
    Maximum
    Payload
    Weight
    108,350 LBS
  • Loading and Packaging

    Properly loading and packing your freight for export is a critical beginning step to the shipping process. Whether you are shipping your cargo in a container or in boxes, it is imperative that you properly pack and secure your goods at origin. By doing this, you are alleviating the potential risk of your freight being damaged or lost. Although our company does not provide a service for loading and packaging assistance unless done at one of our warehouses scattered across the globe, we can help you by supplying insightful information that can ease and better protect you during this process.

    Full Container Loading Tips:

    1. Before you schedule a container to be loaded, check with your local city hall first to see if you need any permits to have a shipping container positioned at your home or facility. Every city is different and has its own unique rules. Any tickets or fines incurred due to noncompliance to city regulations will be to the shipper’s account.
    2. When the container arrives at your location, inspect it of any possible holes or damages. Since these containers have been reused and shipped all around the globe, there is a slight possibility that it can be in poor condition. It is critical that you check to make sure that the container is in good enough shape so that your cargo ships in a safe and secure manner.
    3. The container arrives at your location four feet off the ground. If there is no loading dock at the location, you will be responsible for providing ramps, lifts, or labor to assist with loading the container.
    4. There are a few ways to secure your goods into the container:
      • There are loopholes or rings located on the edges of the container walls near the floor. You can use rope, straps, bungee cords, etc. to loop in and secure the items.
      • The container walls are corrugated or have grooves. You can use plywood or 4’x4’s to create partitions preventing your goods from shifting around in the container.
      • The floor of the container is of wood material. Therefore, you can nail items down to the floor or you can nail wood to the floor to prevent items from moving.
      • Start loading at the front of the container, opposite of the door opening side, and work your way back towards the door. Load all your heavy cargo on the bottom and the lighter ones at the top.
      • When you are finished loading, it is highly recommended that you use 2’x4’s or 4’x4’s to properly brace the container. By doing this, you are promoting a tight fitting load and preventing your freight from moving around within the container.

    Packaging Tips:

    1. Make sure that all your cargo is properly secured inside its packaging. Whether it is inside a box or on a pallet, it is critical that the cargo is well protected to avoid any possible damages that may incur. Shrinkwrap, straps, bubblewrap, and other packaging materials are necessary to properly protect your freight.
    2. Make sure that all your boxes, cartons, or any cardboard material is full of cargo. Any voids can lead to the boxes collapsing and causing damage to the freight.
    3. Make sure that all boxes, crates, pallets, etc. are properly closed or sealed to ensure that the cargo does not get damaged.
    4. It is highly recommended that all your cargo is properly labeled with markings such as order number, ship from/to party, packing slip, etc. This is to alleviate the risk of cargo possibly getting lost in transit.
  • Cargo Insurance

    Allison Shipping takes pride in taking care of our client’s freight like it is our own. We do our best so that your valuable cargo gets to the final destination safe and sound. However in the world of international shipping, there will always be risks present such as fires, sea accidents, acts of God, etc. throughout the course of your shipment which can result in cargo being lost or damaged. Unfortunate situations like this is why there is cargo insurance. Cargo insurance is used to protect the value of your freight against potential losses that can occur during transit in air, ocean, and land shipments. Although cargo insurance is not a requirement, we highly recommend it so you can better protect your freight from exposure to risks. The principle of cargo insurance mirrors that of car insurance. When choosing to pay a small portion of the value of your goods, you are covering yourself for the day the unexpected happens.

FORMS

Shipping Documents

  • Shipper’s Letter of Instructions
    This document is necessary to accurately submit your information to Customs and the shipping line as well as preparing your bill of lading.
  • Commercial Invoice
    If you are conducting business with an overseas buyer, this document is required by Customs worldwide.
  • Packing List
    This document is necessary in order to properly declare what you are shipping.

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